Urology Goes to the Dogs

Here at Elsevier Global Medical News, we aim to report stories with direct clinical relevance. We rarely cover Phase I trials, and virtually never report on test-tube or animal studies. Here is an exception: This study is not so much about research on animals but on research by animals.

Here at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, there are always many studies on detecting and treating prostate cancer. Existing screening methods leave a great deal to be desired. The popular PSA test, for example, is very non-specific—it flags many men who do not have prostate cancer.

Yet a group of French researchers have reported success at training a Belgian Shepherd (Malinois) owned by the French Army to detect prostate cancer by sniffing urine samples.

Here’s a video of the dog in action. The samples are in the drawers.

Presented with urine from 33 patients with confirmed prostate cancer and 33 with elevated PSA levels but without prostate cancer, the dog correctly identified every cancer patient and correctly excluded all but three of the non-cancer patients. Thus the sniff test had a sensitivity of 100%  and a specificity of 92%, a truly remarkable result.

Now you’re not going to see lab-coated pooches in your local doctor’s office any time soon. For one thing, an attempt to train a second dog was unsuccessful. The French investigators hope to figure out which volatile organic compound the dog is detecting, and develop an “electronic nose” to do this automatically.

One question remains: Will the electronic nose be cold and wet? Only time will tell.

—Bob Finn
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1 Comment

Filed under IMNG, Oncology, Urology

One response to “Urology Goes to the Dogs

  1. Dennis Engstrom

    My dog repeatedly sniffed my crotch when I had prostate cancer (including a period before it was diagnosed). After the cancer was eliminated by radiation (external beam and seeds) she stopped the behavior. Sadly, she later developed her own cancer and passed away a couple of years ago.

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