Is Abstinence Contraception?

For many women, abstinence is a reliable way to prevent unwanted pregnancy. But is it a valid form of contraception for young women who are taking the powerful teratogenic drug isotretinoin?

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons user Diacritica

Advisers to the Food and Drug Administration danced around that topic at a meeting examining whether the risk management program for isotretinoin — called iPLEDGE — was effectively reducing the number of pregnancies in women of child-bearing age who take the drug.

Isotretinoin is indicated for a severe, scarring form of acne, but is used off-label for other types of acne, as well.

iPLEDGE began in 2006. As part of the program, young women who are capable of getting pregnant are required to have monthly pregnancy tests during their course of treatment, and to use two methods of birth control. But it’s left up to the women to decide what they will use. According to data submitted to the FDA by isotretinoin maker Mylan Pharmaceuticals, after birth control pills, abstinence was the top choice for all women as a primary method of birth control.

About 13% of women who became pregnant on the program were using abstinence as their primary method, with no back-up contraception. Twenty-five percent of women in the program who were not pregnant used abstinence and no back-up, and another 10% used abstinence as their primary method, with oral contraceptives as the secondary method.

Among isotretinoin-using pre-teen and teenaged girls, abstinence was listed as the primary method. It was the second most popular contraceptive technique for 20- to 29-year-olds.

Mylan reported that there have been 836 pregnancies in the 5 years since iPLEDGE began. Four hundred women chose to end their pregnancies, possibly because of the risk of birth defects. The company does not know the outcomes in 282 of the pregnancies. There were 45 live births; of those there were 8 children born with congenital anomalies.

Pregnancies are declining, though, as reported in our news coverage of the meeting. But even Mylan said in its background materials that, “the most common reason for iPLEDGE pregnancy as reported by the prescriber and the patient, was failure to comply with the iPLEDGE contraceptive requirements (e.g., did not use two forms of birth control, did not use contraception on the date of conception, unsuccessful at abstinence).”

How many pregnancies could be avoided with more specific education for prescribers and for young women about which birth control methods are the most effective?

The FDA advisers heard from Dr. Eleanor B. Schwarz, a University of Pittsburgh ob.gyn., who pleaded for the iPLEDGE program to make a strong recommendation for young women to use IUDs or contraceptive implants.

Some members of the advisory committees agreed that perhaps it was time to provide a more comprehensive guide to the effectiveness of various contraceptive techniques.

FDA officials were largely silent on that matter. And it’s hard to imagine them — or the isotretinoin makers — weighing in on such a dicey topic as which birth control method young women should be using.

What do you think? Should the iPLEDGE program be giving young women more evidence-based information about contraceptives?

—Alicia Ault (@aliciaault on Twitter)

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Filed under Dermatology, Drug And Device Safety, Family Medicine, IMNG, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Primary care

One response to “Is Abstinence Contraception?

  1. Pingback: Contraception Abstinence?

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