When Bats Attack: New Design Should Improve Safety

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Collegiate ballplayers like this athlete from the U.S. Air Force Academy started using the redesigned bats in 2011. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons/Danny Meyer, USAF/Public Domain

Doctors  know about concussions from football, lacrosse, hockey, and similar contact sports, but what about baseball? Apparently, aluminum baseball bats have been implicated in severe injuries and even deaths in school-aged children.

How? It comes down to physics. According to researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, the aluminum bats currently in use can cause the baseball to rebound so quickly, and with so much force, that even an attentive pitcher can’t always get out of the way in time.  In a tragic example, they cited the 2010 death of a 13-year-old pitcher in Vermont — killed by a line drive off an aluminum bat — and noted there have been other reports of similar fatalities.

To cut down on the risk of serious injuries and deaths from hard-hit line drives, the National Collegiate Athletic Association last season started mandating the use of a new style of aluminum bat. The new bat is engineered to put less energy behind the ball once it’s hit, so it is less likely to cause serious harm.

Here’s one of the researchers explaining of the features of the new bat:

This year, the new bats will be used by high school players as well. The National Federation of State High School Associations will enforce the use of the new bats, so ideally the hazards of school baseball will be limited to bug bites and sore jaws from hours of gum-chewing in the outfield.

–Heidi Splete (@hsplete on Twitter)

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Filed under Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Sports Medicine, Video

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