Doctors Face Fallout from Adverse Events

When things go wrong medically or surgically – whether or not a mistake was made – two parties get hurt: the patient and the physician. It’s nice to see increasing attention on the effects of bad outcomes on physicians, as I reported in a previous post.

A new video helps ob.gyns. cope when things go wrong. (Sherry Boschert/IMNG Medical Media)

Here are the latest examples. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) just released a new DVD that it is sending to all ob.gyn. residency program directors to view with their residents. Called “Healing Our Own: Adverse Events in Obstetrics and Gynecology,” the video features ob.gyns. describing the painful effects that adverse events have had on them, and how they recovered.

The video can be viewed in a members-only section of the ACOG website and it was shown in the Exhibit Hall during ACOG’s recent annual meeting.

Both members and non-members are welcome to join (for a fee) an ACOG-sponsored webinar on Adverse Events, Stress, and Litigation on July 10 at 1 p.m. Eastern Time. The webinar will address feelings of isolation, guilt, and shame that physicians commonly experience when bad things happen to their patients, feelings that only get exacerbated if the event leads to a lawsuit.

Ob.gyns. are the sixth most likely medical specialists to get sued regardless of whether a mistake was made, according to a 2011 report in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The stress created by adverse events is just a part of the higher than usual stress levels that physicians try to cope with every day. Tools like the American Medical Association’s A Physician’s Guide To Personal Health offer strategies for staying sane and healthy under stress. Non-profit groups like Medically Induced Trauma Support Services (MITSS) offer tools and templates for health care workers after adverse events, though they mainly focus on helping patients through the trauma. MITSS did post an extensive bibliography online for articles and resources related to the impact of adverse events on caregivers.

If you know of other medical specialty organizations like ACOG that are helping physicians cope with the fallout from adverse events, let us know and we’ll share the resources with our readers.

–Sherry Boschert (on Twitter @sherryboschert)

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1 Comment

Filed under Family Medicine, IMNG, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uncategorized

One response to “Doctors Face Fallout from Adverse Events

  1. Thanks for sharing the information. COG is really helping physician. I am a surgeon & work with Dr Susan Lim Singapore. We specially take care of these kinds of mistakes.

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