Will Noncommunicable Disease Become a Global Health Priority?

Dr. Jean Claude Mbanya photo courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation

On Feb. 24th at the first Global Noncommunicable Disease Network (NCDnet) Forum in Geneva, Dr. Jean Claude Mbanya delivered a key message of his International Diabetes Federation presidency: The world must awaken to the growing threat of noncommunicable disease. 

Launched by the World Health Organization in July 2009 , the NCDnet is a voluntary collaboration involving United Nations agencies, intergovernmental organizations, academia, and the business community. It aims to promote international partnerships for the prevention and control of NCDs. 

“The birth of NCDnet has led to greater recognition for the global epidemic of NCDs, but NCDnet needs money and people if it is to serve as a much needed resource and cannot run on goodwill alone,” Dr. Mbanya said in his speech at the forum. 

He noted that of the more than 2,000 employees at the WHO headquarters, there is just a single person dedicated specifically to diabetes, “a disease affecting 285 million people now and set to rise to 440 million in 20 years time.” According to the network’s newsletter, just 0.9% of the $22 billion spent by international aid agencies in low- and middle-income countries goes to NCDs, although they make up 60% of the total disease burden. 

As he did at the World Diabetes Congress in Montreal last October, Dr. Mbanya spoke of the need for a UN General Assembly Special Session on NCDs to raise global awareness. So far, 57 governments have signed on in support of such a session, which they are hoping will be held in 2011. He also called for NCD indicators to be included in revisions to the U.N. Millennium Development Goals, due to be reviewed in September. 

And he said that NCD medicines, such as generic glucose-lowering drugs and antihypertensives, should be funded just as drugs for HIV/AIDS currently are, along with support for delivery mechanisms and chronic disease education and care models. 

He acknowledged the enormity of the task: “Most cases of NCDs can be prevented, but wholesale NCD prevention will take vision and leadership of a type that we have never seen before. It will require changes in every aspect of our lives — taxation, food policy, advertising, and urban design. We will need to reevaluate the way we live if the human species is to survive.” 

-Miriam E. Tucker (@MiriamETucker on Twitter)

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2 Comments

Filed under Cardiovascular Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Family Medicine, Health Policy, IMNG, Internal Medicine, Primary care

2 responses to “Will Noncommunicable Disease Become a Global Health Priority?

  1. Hi – thanks for the post. I never know what I will come across when I scroll these blogs. But just wanted to let you know I really liked yours. Keep it up.

    Andrew

  2. Miriam E. Tucker

    Thanks so much for your comment, Andrew. I/we plan to!

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