When RA Gets in the Way, and When It Doesn’t

There are people who don’t want to exercise, even though they are physically capable of doing so. Ironically, many people with rheumatoid arthritis want to exercise, but they are unable to do so because of chronic pain.

from flickr user dglider (creative commons)

The physical and psychological benefits of exercise are no secret, but in a study by Dr. Vibeke Strand of Stanford (Calif.) University, 49% of women reported that RA pain prevented them from participating in sports and exercising. Dr. Strand’s study, presented at the annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR) in Rome  included nearly 2,000 women with RA.

Of these women, approximately two-thirds said that they experienced pain on a daily basis, including a majority of those who reported taking pain medication regularly. The study participants also reported that RA interfered with leisure activities and personal relationships, and even contributed to the deterioration of friendships and the end of marriages, Dr. Strand said in an interview.

The complete study data highlight the challenges of assessing and treating pain in patients with RA. The study results were limited by the use of self-reports of RA, but approximately 67% of the women said that they were constantly searching for new forms of pain relief.

Another event at the meeting highlighted how exercise empowers RA patients, including some who are severely disabled. An organization called Biking Against Rheumatism in Europe (BARIE) sponsored a multiday event in which a group of bikers, including individuals with severe RA riding on customized bikes, rode from Brussels to Rome, arriving on the first day of the meeting. Dr Strand’s data suggest that most of them were battling chronic pain. The goal of BARIE is to raise awareness of rheumatism. Ideally, more awareness will lead to more support for research, so more patients can live pain free for better physical and psychological health.

–Heidi Splete (on twitter @hsplete)

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Filed under Alternative and Complementary Medicine, IMNG, Rheumatology

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