Rolling Out Health Reform: The Policy & Practice Podcast

Many of the hallmarks of the Affordable Care Act, such as state-based health exchanges to purchase insurance, won’t go into effect until 2014. But, in the meantime, officials at the Department of Health and Human Services are plenty busy rolling out other provisions of the law, making adjustments to some of the law’s programs, and just promoting what they’ve done so far.

Recently, HHS officials announced that they would stop granting exemptions that allow limited-benefit health plans to keep in place low annual coverage limits that are at odds with the Affordable Care Act. HHS has been granting waivers to these so-called “mini-med” plans in an effort to keep the products affordable for consumers. But no more. Starting on Sept. 23, HHS will no longer accept waiver applications or extension requests from these plans. And, in 2014, all health plans will be barred from placing annual limits on coverage under the health reform law.

HHS has also been busy promoting the availability of free preventive services for Medicare beneficiaries. Starting at the beginning of this year, Medicare beneficiaries were eligible to receive recommended preventives services ranging from mammograms to smoking cessation counseling with no copays or deductibles under Medicare Part B.

Photo courtesy National Cancer Institute.

But seniors haven’t flocked to take advantage of the services. Only about one in six Medicare beneficiaries has accessed the free services, according to a government report. So HHS is launching a public outreach campaign that includes radio and TV ads. The government is also reaching out to physicians, asking them to discuss the preventive services with patients.

For more on the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, plus a recap of the American Medical Association’s House of Delegates meeting, check out this week’s edition of the Policy & Practice podcast.

Take a listen and share your thoughts:

The Policy & Practice podcast is taking a break next week, but check back on July 11for all the latest developments in health reform.

— Mary Ellen Schneider (on Twitter @MaryEllenNY)

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Filed under Family Medicine, Geriatric Medicine, Health Policy, health reform, IMNG, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Physician Reimbursement, Podcast, Practice Trends

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