Tag Archives: American Academy of Family Physicians

Help Is on the Way for Primary Care Doctors (Wink, Wink)

Help is on the way “very soon” for family physicians, internists, and pediatricians in the form of a final rule for accountable care organizations (ACOs).

Based on extensive feedback on the proposed ACO rule, changes are coming that primary care physicians are going to like, Dr. Nancy Nielsen said.

The preliminary  rule  “was met with – how shall I say? – an underwhelming response by the medical community,” said Dr. Nielsen, Senior Advisor of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation established as part of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) by the Affordable Care Act.

“We have a few code words we have to work out here so I don’t get into trouble, but you get what I am trying to say,” Dr. Nielsen said at the American Academy of Family Physicians Congress of Delegates. For example, if I tell you ‘it has been suggested to us,’ that is REALLY important and it may be coming out, but I can’t announce anything yet,” said Dr. Nielsen, an internist and former president of the American Medical Association.

Regarding ACOs, Dr. Nielsen said, “Very soon the final rule will come out. Very soon. CMS has listened to the feedback:”

“It has been suggested to us that 65 quality measures are way too many.”

“It has been suggested to us that the mechanism for the shared savings ought to be done differently.”

“And it clearly has been suggested to us that hospitals have the ability to come up with the capital to start an ACO, but it’s really tough for doctors. So it has been suggested to us that we give advanced payment. I am here to say that very soon you will see that, and very soon you will like what you see.”

Although doctors have always been accountable for the care of patients, now they also will be accountable for resource expenditures, and the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation plans to help, Dr. Nielsen said. There will be new expectations and new tools given to primary care physicians. “I will tell you that never once in my 23 years of practice did I see data showing me what it cost when I ordered an x-ray. Do you know what it costs when you write a prescription for an antibiotic? Do you get that data? No, you have never seen that.”

“But you must help us achieve this … when the [internal] warfare within the house of medicine begins,” Dr. Nielsen said. “I have a pet peeve. It really makes me crazy when people talk about people who do primary care as ‘primary care physicians’ and all the other docs as ‘specialists.’” She said that family physicians, internists, and pediatricians should stand together and say ‘We are specialists, just like you are specialists. We have a critical role to play and we need to have the tools to help us play that role.”

“Stay tuned. A lot of things you are going to, like, have been suggested to us.”

Dr. Nielsen’s comments were streamed live on the Internet during the congress and are available as archived video.

–Damian McNamara

@MedReporter on Twitter

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Filed under Blognosis, Family Medicine, IMNG, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Physician Reimbursement, Practice Trends

I See What You Mean

From the annual meeting of the Heart Rhythm Society, Denver:

Physicians planning to attend the upcoming annual meetings of the American Academy of Family Physicians, Society of Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound, or American Public Health Association at Denver’s Colorado Convention Center should prepare themselves for Shock and Awww when they encounter the big blue bear, a whimsical 40-foot tall sculpture peering through the glass to see what’s going on inside.

The sculpture by British-born University of Denver artist Lawrence Argent  is titled, “I See What You Mean.” Commissioned under the city’s 1%-for-public-art program, the big blue bear weighs 10,000 pounds and is composed of more than 4,000 polymer and concrete interlocking triangles over a steel frame. Argent began with a small plastic toy he scanned and converted into a digital computer file, which he then sculpted electronically.

The big blue bear has become a popular, feel-good tourist attraction. It also serves as a convenient meeting point for conventioneers who become disoriented by the conference center’s long, white, largely unmarked corridors.

— Bruce Jancin

Photo by Bruce Jancin

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A Farewell to Ted: The Policy & Practice Podcast

From phone interviews and teleconferences.

A touch of somberness was added to the normally very quiet final week of August in Washington, as the nation and the nation’s capital absorbed the news that Ted Kennedy, the second-longest serving Senator, had died after a year-long battle with brain cancer.  The Democratic and fiercely liberal champion of civil rights, health, and human welfare, was mourned and celebrated for several days before a motorcade brought his body to Arlington (Va.) National Cemetery, where he was buried next to his two brothers.

From the White House Flickr stream

From the White House Flickr stream

This week, the Policy & Practice Podcast pays tribute to the Senator, with input from President Obama, Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.), and representatives from the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Family Physicians.

Please take a listen. As Sen. Dodd said, there’s unlikely to be another senator like Ted Kennedy.

— Alicia Ault (on Twitter @aliciaault)

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Filed under Family Medicine, health reform, Internal Medicine, Podcast, Practice Trends, Primary care