Tag Archives: residents

Video of the Week: Celebrating 40 Years of Family Practice, Part I

Family Practice News is celebrating 40 years of covering this primary care medical specialty. Family Practice News was there when the American Academy of General Practice became the American Academy of Family Physicians in 1971.

As family medicine was being formally recognized as a medical specialty in 1971, three young physicians were preparing to enter the field. Family Practice News sat down with the 2nd-year family practice residents at that time to find out what they thought of their training, their newly recognized specialty, and what their careers would hold.

Now, 40 years later, we invited them to look back on how their expectations stacked up to the reality of clinical practice. We’re going to feature their video interviews over the next few weeks. This week, get to know Dr. Alva S. “Buzz” Baker.

The most valuable life lesson from medicine has really been  don’t sweat the small stuff.

Check back weekly to hear more wisdom from the FP class of 1971 and don’t miss our 40th anniversary coverage.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Family Medicine, Primary care, Video

Present at the Creation: Family Physicians Reflect on 4 Decades

As family medicine was being formally recognized as a medical specialty in 1971, three young physicians were preparing to enter the field. For its inaugural issue, Family Practice News sat down with the second-year family practice residents at that time to find out what they thought of their training, their newly recognized specialty, and what their careers would hold.

Now, 40 years later, we’ve invited them to look back on how their expectations stacked up to the reality of clinical practice.

Although the three physicians came into the specialty in much the same way, their subsequent career choices led them down different paths.

To view Family Practice News’ original interviews in 1971 with Dr. Alva S. Baker, Dr. William D. Hakkarinen, and Dr. Daniel R. McCready, go to Family Practice News, Oct. 1971. To read their reflections 40 years later, check out the Feb. 15 issue of Family Practice News at http://www.familypracticenews.com.

Leave a comment

Filed under Family Medicine, IMNG, Pediatrics, Primary care, Uncategorized

Could You Gather ‘Round, Please?

  Two new studies suggest that the popular practice of including patients and family members during hospital rounds is gaining even greater momentum.

Family-centered rounds were the most common rounding practice among 265 U.S. and Canadian pediatric hospitalists surveyed as part of the PRIS (Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings) Network Triennial Survey.

 The recently published survey, described as the first national study of pediatric hospitalists to identify current rounding practices, reported that 48% of academic and 31% of non-academic respondents used family-centered rounds.

The long-standing concern that having family members present would increase rounding time did not materialize, with academic setting and higher daily patient censuses being the only significant causes of longer rounding duration.

 This finding contradicts previous research and “may be used to enhance FCR buy-in by hospitals considering or initiating FCRs,” the authors suggest.

The most common perceived barrier to FCR, cited by 44% of respondents, was that the rounding team size was prohibitive. Other barriers include trainees’ fear of not appearing knowledgeable in front of families, a negative impact on physician work flow and patient confidentiality.

Several professional groups, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, already endorse family-centered care as a way to improve team communication and outcomes.

 Indeed, the study noted that bedside nurse participation was perceived as being significantly greater on FCR rounds than on other types such as sit-down or hallway rounds (83% vs. 51%). Considering their work in the trenches, this finding says a lot.

 In a second study, presented at the Pediatric Hospital Medicine 2010 meeting, EEGs and head MRIs were completed faster after implementation of FCR at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis.

FCR also increased the percentage of discharges on the first shift, from 40% to 47% – not an insignificant amount, according to lead author Dr. Jennifer Oshimura, a pediatric hospitalist fellow at the Indianapolis-based hospital.

 “It took a little while for the whole staff to buy in,” she said in an interview. “It takes more effort for the medical students, residents and interns to know what to present. It helps for them to learn; otherwise they just spit up data.”

For anyone who’s ever been on the receiving end of that data, the effort is appreciated.

– Patrice Wendling (on Twitter @pwendl)

Bookmark and Share

1 Comment

Filed under Family Medicine, Hospital and Critical Care Medicine, IMNG, Uncategorized

Match Day Brings Good News for Family Medicine

Image via Flickr user Tulane Public Relations by Creative Commons License.

Happy Match Day! Earlier today, medical school seniors across the country learned where they would do their residency training. But today is not just about how medical students will be spending their next 3-7 years. It’s also about which specialties are hot… or not… in the eyes of future physicians.

This year’s results should make family physicians hopeful. The number of U.S. medical school seniors who chose family medicine residencies rose 9% over last year. This year, nearly 45% of the slots were filled by U.S. medical graduates. That’s the highest percentage of U.S. students entering family medicine since 2002, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. Why the increase? Dr. Lori Heim, president of the AAFP, says it has something to do with the debate on health reform. With politicians, physicians, and policy experts all talking about the importance of primary care and the medical home, students are the getting the picture that being a family physician might be worthwhile.

The 2010 resident match results also indicate that areas like dermatology, neurological surgery, orthopedic surgery, and otolaryngology are some of the top choices for U.S. medical students, as they have been for many years.
Again in 2010, these areas were the most competitive, according to the National Resident Matching Program, with at least 90% of the available slots in each specialty being filled by U.S. medical school seniors.

— Mary Ellen Schneider (on Twitter @MaryEllenNY)

Bookmark and Share

2 Comments

Filed under Dermatology, Family Medicine, IMNG, Neurology and Neurological Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Practice Trends, Primary care