Tag Archives: youth

A ‘Health Shock’ for Youth with Diabetes

While the financial impact of diabetes on the delivery of medicine and related health care is a popular area of research, the nonmedical implications for young adults “have gone virtually unexplored,” lead author Jason M. Fletcher, Ph.D.,  associate professor of public health at Yale University, declared in the January 2012 issue of Health Affairs.

Jason M. Fletcher, Ph.D./Photo courtesy Yale University

According to results from a study Dr. Fletcher conducted with his associate Michael R. Richards, a doctoral candidate at Yale, the nonmedical consequences of diabetes can occur early in life and are associated with certain adverse effects. For example, a person with diabetes can expect to earn significantly less income over his or her working life compared with one who does not have the disease. Diabetes patients also more likely to drop out of high school and less likely to attend college.

The study was based on a survey of nearly 15,000 youth in grades 7-12 who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health in 1994 and 1995 and who completed follow-up surveys in 1996, 2001/2002, and in 2008, when most were about 30 years old (Health Aff. 2012; 31:27-34). The researchers found that the high school dropout rate among people with diabetes was 6% higher than the rate among people without the disease. In addition, people with diabetes were 8%-13% less likely to attend college compared to their peers without the disease. Interestingly, having a parent with diabetes lowered the chances of attending college by another 4%-6%.

Over a 40-year work lifetime, people with diabetes can expect to earn $160,000 less in wages compared with people who do not have the disease. The researchers termed the double-whammy of adverse impact on schooling and wages as a “health shock” to people with diabetes.

“These results highlight the urgency of attacking this growing health problem, as well as the need for measures such as in-school screening for whether diabetes’s impact on individual learning and performance begins before the classic manifestations of clinical diabetes appear,” the researchers concluded.

— Doug Brunk

2 Comments

Filed under Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Family Medicine, IMNG, Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine News, Pediatrics, Primary care

Smoking Scenes in Youth-Rated Movies Decline, But More Work Remains

iStockphoto

For the fifth year in a row, the number of smoking scenes in major youth-rated movies has declined, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, the percentage of top-grossing movies with no tobacco incidents were the highest in 2010 compared with the last 20 years.

The report, Smoking in Top-Grossing Movies – United States 2010,  showed that the number of onscreen tobacco incidents in youth-rated movies (G, PG, or PG-13) dropped from 2,093 in 2005 to 595 in 2010. That’s almost a 72% decrease.

That’s the good news.

The bad news is that one in five high school students still smoke and “there’s still a substantial amount of smoking in youth-related films,” said Stanton A. Glantz, Ph.D., one of the study authors and director of Smoke Free Movies, in a news conference.

Several studies have indicated that smoking in movies increases the odds smoking initiation among youth.

Physicians ought to be educating parents that this is a real problem and that they should not let their youth watch movies that have smoking in them, said Dr. Glantz in a phone interview. His Web site lists the smoking status of top-grossing movies every week.

The report is also the first to look at the impact of policy. Three of the six major studios which have adopted a smoking-reduction policies between 2004 and 2007 had lowered their on-screen smoking incidents much more than those studios with no policy in place.

“The data find that three major movie studios (Comcast/Universal, Disney and Time Warner/Warner Bros.) have almost eliminated tobacco from their youth-rated movies, reducing the number of tobacco incidents per film (G/PG/PG13) by 96 percent.  In contrast, studios without policies as well as independent companies (News Corporation/Twentieth Century Fox, Sony/Columbia/Screen Gems and Viacom/Paramount) reduced tobacco depictions in youth-rated movies by an average of only 42 percent over the same period,” according to a news release by the Legacy for Longer Healthier Lives, which hosted a news conference following the report’s release.

The authors admit that implementation of policy won’t affect youths exposure to older movies and that youths do watch R-rated movies, but they recommend several solutions.

They suggest anti-tobacco ads before the movies that have smoking scenes. They also recommend expanding the R rating to include movies with smoking as one way to reduce adolescent exposure to on-screen smoking.

“And if you want to get politically involved,” said Dr. Glantz, “work with your state to stop subsidizing movies with smoking in them.” Almost all states offer movie producers subsidies in the form of tax credit or cash rebates to attract movie production to their states, according to the CDC report. “The 15 states subsidizing top-grossing movies with tobacco incidents spent more on these productions in 2010 ($288 million) than they budgeted for their state tobacco-control programs in 2011 ($280 million),” the authors write.

The authors used data from the Thumbs Up! Thumbs Down! project, which counts occurrences of tobacco incidents in U.S. top-grossing movies each year, to update their 2010 report.

By Naseem S. Miller (@ReportingBack)

1 Comment

Filed under Family Medicine, Health Policy, IMNG, Internal Medicine, Primary care